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CJ’s Guide to Safe Wet Weather Driving

March 10th, 2017
To maximize your driving safety in wet weather conditions, be aware of the road conditions, reduce speed appropriately, and be prepared for challenging situations. Make sure all of your lights and wipers are working properly. And don’t take your tires for granted. Make sure they have enough tread depth left and keep them properly inflated so they can keep control of your vehicle in your hands.
  Posted in: Tire Basics

Is Your Car “Rain Safe”?

February 27th, 2017
Two of the most important keys to keeping your car “rain safe” are wipers and tires. For many people, driving on a rainy day is more hazardous than driving in winter weather. According to the American Automobile Association, wet road surfaces contribute to nearly 1.2 million traffic crashes each year. In fact almost 50 percent of weather-related crashes happened during rainfall, but just 17 percent happened, while it was snowing or sleeting. These statistics can be partially explained, of course, by the fact that many drivers have the good sense to stay home during a bad winter weather. But the statistics also reflect a sobering truth: Drivers often do not respect the rain, and they fail to adjust their driving habits to hazardous conditions.
  Posted in: Car Care Tips

Get Your Car Really, Really, REALLY Clean!

February 23rd, 2017

It can be a lot of work and attention to detail to get your car really clean…especially if it’s pretty dirty to start with…but here are some ideas for truly thorough cleaning that you may not have thought of!Cleaning Car

--A cheap foam paintbrush can get into crevices (like A/C vents) that might be impossible otherwise. As you loosen up dust from these spots, keep a vacuum cleaner nozzle at work in your other hand to suck up the dust and prevent it from settling other places.

--A soft-bristled brush is perfect for cleaning around radio knobs and other buttons.

--While you’re cleaning, don’t forget to locate your cabin air filter and replace it. A dirty cabin air filter can lead to a lot of odd smells and stinks. Check your owner’s manual; cabin ...[more]

  Tags: tips
  Posted in: Auto Repair 101

Can I Buy Just Two Tires?

February 9th, 2017

We know that a lot of drivers are working pretty hard to make a dollar go farther and that the outlay for a full set of four tires – even inexpensive tires – can be considerable. That’s why we run across drivers pretty often who ask if it’s okay to just replace a pair of tires, then buy the other pair when they can afford them.

The answer is…yes, but…New Tires

You’ll really need to pay attention to the size of the set of tires that you’ve already got and go with that exact same size of tires for your new pair. Having mismatched sizes of tires on your vehicle can result in squirrelly and unpredictable handling and ride quality. If your existing tires are all-season, go with all-season tires. If they’re winter tires, go with winter tires. Idea ...[more]

  Posted in: Tires 101

Are You Ready For A Roadside Emergency?

January 26th, 2017

Yeah, yeah…your vehicle’s fairly new and you take care of it, and you’ve even got a membership in AAA. That doesn’t mean that your chances of Car troubleending up in a tight spot are zero. It’s just common sense to be prepared with a trouble bag in your car. Here’s a pretty good rundown of things you should keep in a car emergency kit:

Fully charged cell phone: You may want to consider a cheap prepaid “burner phone” with a long battery life and keep it strictly in the car. If nothing else, at least keep a charged-up power bank on hand.

First-aid kit: At a bare minimum, a first-aid kit should include gauze pads and bandage tape, aspirins, antiseptic wipes, scissors, antiseptic cream or ointment, Band-Aids, ru ...[more]

  Tags: tips
  Posted in: Auto Repair 101

Conventional Oil Changes vs. Synthetic Oil Changes

January 17th, 2017
If you’ve ever gotten your car’s oil changed, you may have been asked if you would like a synthetic blend or full-synthetic oil change, instead of a conventional oil change. Though you have probably heard the terminology before, you may not be sure exactly what it is or, more importantly, it might be a good thing for your car.
  Posted in: Auto Repair 101

Flat Spots? Let’s Clear Up Some Myths About That…

January 12th, 2017

So your vehicle’s been sitting for a while…you get in it, start the engine and pull out of the driveway when you notice a hard, rough (but very regular) vibration that only gets worse with speed. It doesn’t feel like it’s coming from the driveline or suspension – so what is it?

Flat spots on tires

It could be that the tires have developed flat spots.

With the weight of the vehicle pressing down on the tires for long periods, a section of the rubber and belts can become softer (or harder) than the rest of the tire. This can be exacerbated by cold weather, or just by parking on a cold concrete floor.

Low-profile tires with short sidewalls can be more prone to flat-spotting, as can tires with an H or higher speed rating. In most cases, you can ...[more]

  Tags: tires, tire
  Posted in: Tires 101

So You Think Some Traffic Laws Are Nuts?

December 29th, 2016

Yes, there are plenty of traffic laws in certain areas that don’t make much sense. Here, though, we present a collection of traffic laws from other parts of the world that are just bizarre:

--In Thailand, the law states that no driver, male or female, shall ever drive without a shirt.Weird Traffic Laws

--In South Africa, “the driver of a vehicle on a public road shall stop such vehicle at the request or on the signal of a person leading or driving any bovine animal, horse, ass, mule, sheep, goat, pig, or ostrich on such road.” Or face a $500 fine.

--Splashing a pedestrian with water is illegal in Japan.

--In Montana, you can forget about driving with a sheep in the truck unless the sheep has a chaperone... and the state of Alabama had the presence of mi ...[more]

  Tags: tips, auto facts
  Posted in: Auto Repair 101

A Brief Explanation of Tire Information

December 15th, 2016

Ever wonder what the designations stamped on your tire sidewall actually mean? We’d like to break it down for you.

Let’s take for instance, “P195/60R15 87S”. This is a full service description of a tire.

In this case, “87S” denotes a tire’s load capacity and speed rating. The higher the number, the greater the load capacity – an 87 load capacity means that tire can support 1,201 pounds. Speed ratings range from L (75 mph) through V (149 mph), and an S speed rating means the tire is good for 112 mph. W, Y, and Z-speed rated tires are available for extreme performance cars and are rated as high as 186 mph.

As for the rest of the information:Tire

--“P” denotes Passenger Tire

--195 is the tire’s width from s ...[more]

  Tags: tires, tire pressure
  Posted in: Tires 101

Winter Driving Tips

December 12th, 2016
When temperatures fall below freezing and precipitation makes roads slippery, driving can be both stressful and dangerous. Motorists should know what they can do to remain safer when winter driving is a necessity as well as how to deal with winter road emergencies.
  Posted in: Tire Basics
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